Confidentiality

Under the Data Protection Act 1998, you have a right to know who holds personal information about you. This person or organisation is called the data controller. In the NHS, the data controller is usually your local NHS board and your GP surgery. The NHS must keep your personal health information confidential. It is your right.

What if I am under 16?

Anyone who looks after your health has to keep information about you private. This may be doctors, nurses, pharmacists or other health workers.

The information tells you only about how things work in the health service, not other organisations such as your school or social services.

When you are young, your parents are usually involved in your health care. They may make decisions for you, and speak to health workers on your behalf. But as you get older you have more rights. You can decide if you want your parents to be involved or not.

  • In Scotland if you are 12 or over, the law assumes you can make your own decisions about your health care information unless there is evidence to suggest you can’t
  • If you are under 12, you may still be able to make decisions about your health care information but the doctor must believe that you understand enough to do this
  • When we talk about parents, we also mean anyone who is your legal guardian
  • If you want to talk about your health in private, and you need an interpreter, ask our reception staff to arrange this for you
  • If you are over 12 years of age Practice staff are unable to provide confidential information to your parent or guardian unless you have given us written permission to do so

For further information concerning Confidentiality and your rights please visit the Health Rights Information Scotland

Information kindly provided by Health Rights Information Scotland

Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002

The Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002 introduces important new laws about our obligations to make information publicly available. The Act gives people new rights to access information. Most of these rights come into effect from January 2005. The Act opens with a general statement that “A person who requests information from a Scottish public authority which holds it, is entitled to be given it by the authority, section 1 (1) Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002.

Any person or organisation can make a request for information which is not already detailed in our Publication Scheme. They do not have to work or live in Glasgow. A request for information must be in writing and made to the Practice Manager. The applicant must give their name and an address for the reply. They do not need to say they want the information. They may express a preference for information to be provided in a particular form e.g. paper copies or memory stick. We should aim to comply with their requested preference. We are not obliged to charge applicants for supplying information if we do we will inform you before providing the information. We have 20 days to comply with your request.

If you are unhappy with the information provided please contact the Scottish Information Commissioner who has the power to enforce individuals with rights under the act.

Contact can be made at :

Kinburn Castle.
Doubledykes Road.
St Andrews.
Fife KY16 9DS.

Telephone: 01334 464610. Fax: 01334 464611.

You can also download the  Freedom of Information Fact Sheet for further advice.

Email: enquiries@topublicknowledge.

Freedom Of Information